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chore: bump to 3.21.0

merge-requests/54/head
Henry Schreiner 3 months ago
parent
commit
70c2198b05
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  1. 2
      .bumpversion.cfg
  2. 2
      .gitlab-ci.yml
  3. 2
      README.md
  4. 6
      chapters/basics.md
  5. 12
      chapters/intro/installing.md
  6. 2
      examples/CMakeLists.txt
  7. 4
      examples/extended-project/CMakeLists.txt
  8. 2
      examples/fetch/CMakeLists.txt
  9. 2
      examples/root-dict/CMakeLists.txt
  10. 2
      examples/root-simple/CMakeLists.txt
  11. 2
      examples/root-usefile/CMakeLists.txt
  12. 2
      examples/simple-project/CMakeLists.txt

2
.bumpversion.cfg

@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
[bumpversion]
current_version = 3.20.5
current_version = 3.21.0
[bumpversion:file:.gitlab-ci.yml]
search = cmake-{current_version}-linux

2
.gitlab-ci.yml

@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ test_code:
- apt-get update && apt-get install -y make cmake libboost-dev git
# We will install latest CMake, even though Ubuntu has a recent one
- mkdir -p $HOME/.local
- curl -s "https://cmake.org/files/v3.20/cmake-3.20.5-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C $HOME/.local
- curl -s "https://cmake.org/files/v3.21/cmake-3.21.0-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C $HOME/.local
- export PATH=$HOME/.local/bin:$PATH
script:
- cmake -S examples -B build

2
README.md

@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ Certainly there are no shortage of problems when building.
But I think that, in 2020, we have a very good solution to quite a few of those problems.
It's CMake. Not CMake 2.8 though; that was released before C++11 even existed!
Nor the horrible examples out there for CMake (even those posted on KitWare's own tutorials list).
I'm talking about Modern CMake. CMake 3.4+, maybe even CMake 3.20+!
I'm talking about Modern CMake. CMake 3.4+, maybe even CMake 3.21+!
It's clean, powerful, and elegant, so you can spend most of your time coding, not adding lines to an unreadable, unmaintainable Make (Or CMake 2) file.
And CMake 3.11+ is supposed to be significantly faster, as well!

6
chapters/basics.md

@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ Windows users, who also usually have a very recent version of CMake.
This is what new projects should do:
```cmake
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.7...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.7...3.21)
if(${CMAKE_VERSION} VERSION_LESS 3.12)
cmake_policy(VERSION ${CMAKE_MAJOR_VERSION}.${CMAKE_MINOR_VERSION})
@ -56,10 +56,10 @@ you will want to do this instead:
```cmake
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.7)
if(${CMAKE_VERSION} VERSION_LESS 3.20)
if(${CMAKE_VERSION} VERSION_LESS 3.21)
cmake_policy(VERSION ${CMAKE_MAJOR_VERSION}.${CMAKE_MINOR_VERSION})
else()
cmake_policy(VERSION 3.20)
cmake_policy(VERSION 3.21)
endif()
```

12
chapters/intro/installing.md

@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
Your CMake version should be newer than your compiler. It should be newer than the libraries you are using (especially Boost). New versions work better for everyone.
{% endhint %}
If you have a built in copy of CMake, it isn't special or customized for your system. You can easily install a new one instead, either on the system level or the user level. Feel free to instruct your users here if they complain about a CMake requirement being set too high. Especially if they want 3.1+ support. Maybe even if they want 3.20+ support...
If you have a built in copy of CMake, it isn't special or customized for your system. You can easily install a new one instead, either on the system level or the user level. Feel free to instruct your users here if they complain about a CMake requirement being set too high. Especially if they want 3.1+ support. Maybe even if they want 3.21+ support...
#### Quick list (more info on each method below)
@ -34,14 +34,14 @@ You can [download CMake from KitWare][download]. This is how you will probably g
On Linux, there are several options. Kitware provides a [Debian/Ubunutu apt repository][apt], as well as [snap packages][snap]. There are universal Linux binaries provided, but you'll need to pick an install location. If you already use `~/.local` for user-space packages, the following single line command[^1] will get CMake for you [^2]:
{% term %}
~ $ wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.20/cmake-3.20.5-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C ~/.local
~ $ wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.21/cmake-3.21.0-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C ~/.local
{% endterm %}
The names changed in 3.20; older releases had names like `cmake-3.19.7-Linux-x86_64.tar.gz`. If you just want a local folder with CMake only:
The names changed in 3.21; older releases had names like `cmake-3.19.7-Linux-x86_64.tar.gz`. If you just want a local folder with CMake only:
{% term %}
~ $ mkdir -p cmake-3.20 && wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.20/cmake-3.20.5-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C cmake-3.20
~ $ export PATH=`pwd`/cmake-3.20/bin:$PATH
~ $ mkdir -p cmake-3.21 && wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.21/cmake-3.21.0-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C cmake-3.21
~ $ export PATH=`pwd`/cmake-3.21/bin:$PATH
{% endterm %}
You'll obviously want to append to the PATH every time you start a new terminal, or add it to your `.bashrc` or to an [LMod][] system.
@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ You'll obviously want to append to the PATH every time you start a new terminal,
And, if you want a system install, install to `/usr/local`; this is an excellent choice in a Docker container, for example on GitLab CI. Do not try it on a non-containerized system.
{% term %}
docker $ wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.20/cmake-3.20.5-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C /usr/local
docker $ wget -qO- "https://cmake.org/files/v3.21/cmake-3.21.0-linux-x86_64.tar.gz" | tar --strip-components=1 -xz -C /usr/local
{% endterm %}

2
examples/CMakeLists.txt

@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.11...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.11...3.21)
project(ModernCMakeExamples)
set(MODERN_CMAKE_BUILD_TESTING ON)

4
examples/extended-project/CMakeLists.txt

@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
# Works with 3.11 and tested through 3.20
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.11...3.20)
# Works with 3.11 and tested through 3.21
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.11...3.21)
# Project name and a few useful settings. Other commands can pick up the results
project(

2
examples/fetch/CMakeLists.txt

@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.14...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.14...3.21)
project(FetchExample LANGUAGES CXX)

2
examples/root-dict/CMakeLists.txt

@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
## [main]
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.4...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.4...3.21)
project(RootDictExample LANGUAGES CXX)

2
examples/root-simple/CMakeLists.txt

@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
# CMake ROOT simple example
## [main]
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.21)
project(RootSimpleExample LANGUAGES CXX)

2
examples/root-usefile/CMakeLists.txt

@ -1,7 +1,7 @@
# CMake ROOT usefile example
## [main]
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.21)
project(RootUseFileExample LANGUAGES CXX)

2
examples/simple-project/CMakeLists.txt

@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
# You should always specify a range with the newest
# and oldest tested versions of CMake. This will ensure
# you pick up the best policies.
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.20)
cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 3.1...3.21)
# This is your project statement. You should always list languages;
# Listing the version is nice here since it sets lots of useful variables

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